British Values

The government set out their definition of British values in the 2011 Prevent Strategy. These were reinforced in September 2014 due to recent events. These regulations sit alongside the requirements of the Equalities Act, which also applies to all types of schools.

Schools are expected to focus on, and be able to show, how our work with pupils is effective in embedding fundamental British values.

Promoting British values at Parkstone Primary School:

We have a School Council, with membership from Year 1 to Year 6, which meets regularly to discuss and to plan projects that will improve the school and be of benefit to its pupils. Prospective School Council members are democratically elected into office by their peers. Pupils are asked to complete a pupil voice questionnaire each academic year so that their views and perceptions about various aspects of school can be recorded and analysed. In classes, we encourage and support children to learn to listen to and respect the opinions of others even if they do not always agree. Through all their learning activities, children are encouraged to: discuss, listen, debate and question as these are all important skills to learn and use when living and taking part in a democratic society.

The Behaviour Policy at Parkstone is clear regarding the rules and expectations expected of all children. Children are clear that rules are essential to maintain safety and order; for self, others and the environment. In school, children are taught that sanctions and consequences will be enforced if the rules are not adhered to and by implication this extends to life in modern Britain as a whole. The children also learn through cross-curricular activities about laws, which govern our country. The children learn about “fair play” through taking part in sports events and PE lessons. They learn how to play within the rules of a particular sport.

From the earliest opportunity, our children are encouraged to consider their opportunities and to recognise how to make choices which are right for them and those around them. The school seeks to create a positive learning environment in which children develop the confidence to voice their opinion and know it will be respectfully considered and valued. We accept that all children make mistakes and our role as educators is to guide the children in learning from their mistakes, in effect learning from the consequence their actions had led too. Children learn about their rights as young people and how these can be lived out in their lives, with an emphasis on keeping themselves safe, for example through E-safety lessons and PHSE activities.

Mutual respect is at the heart of our values. All members of the school community, whether they are an adult or a child, are expected to treat each other with respect, along with the readiness to acknowledge that we are all unique, with individual qualities. Celebration Assemblies are planned each week, where a wide range of academic, sporting, musical and community achievements are celebrated through certificates. PE competitions and charity days also provide opportunities for children to extend their development of Mutual Respect by working with and supporting others from communities and backgrounds different to their own.

We teach our children about the culturally diverse society in which they live. We have a broad and balanced RE curriculum, which explores key faiths, their religious practice and culture. Through cross-curricular work, the children learn about other cultures, exploring similarities and differences. Parkstone provides a variety of opportunities for pupils to visit places of worship as well as those of cultural interest. We also actively encourage visitors from a range of communities, cultures and organisations into our school.

‘Teachers use ‘pinny time’ to revisit the sounds that children have been
taught, as they learn through play.’

Ofsted

‘Leaders
have provided teachers with the phonics training they need.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils are very positive about their
mathematics work.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils talk with pride about the ‘leading learner’ badges
they get for reading regularly, arriving on time and trying hard.’

Ofsted

‘The reading curriculum is well organised.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils thrive at this inclusive school.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils could talk about rainfall and temperature graphs, as well as the impact of the River Nile on Egyptian settlements.’

Ofsted

‘Classrooms are oases of calm. As a
result, pupils are happy. They feel safe at school.’

Ofsted

‘Staff are happy, and morale
is high.’

Ofsted

‘All
adults have high expectations of pupils’ behaviour.’

Ofsted

‘In Reception, phonics is taught every day.’

Ofsted

‘Children in early years learn phonics as soon as they start school.’

Ofsted

‘Teachers say that leaders listen to their views and help them to manage their workload.’

Ofsted

‘Leaders’ relationships and sex education and health education
curriculums give pupils an age-appropriate understanding of healthy relationships.’

Ofsted

‘ Subject leaders benefit from meeting staff in
other trust schools to exchange ideas and good practice.’

Ofsted

‘Reception children get opportunities to explore numbers all the time.
Daily mathematics lessons help them to count with speed and confidence.’

Ofsted

‘All pupils know the school rules.’

Ofsted

‘The governing body challenges leaders on the actions they are taking to improve the school.’

Ofsted

‘Teachers model language and sounds accurately. This means that Reception children get off to a strong start with their reading.’

Ofsted

‘Teachers have strong subject
knowledge and use geographical vocabulary with precision.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils discuss and analyse texts during their
‘reading mastery’ lessons.’

Ofsted

‘One pupil told the
inspector that, ‘school is amazing because teachers include everyone.’

Ofsted

‘In mathematics, teachers make daily checks on pupils’ understanding. This ensures that the work pupils do is suitably challenging.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils enjoy the books their teacher reads to them.’

Ofsted

‘Pupils who are falling behind in their phonics get extra help to catch up.’

Ofsted

‘The geography curriculum is a strength of the school.
Leaders have carefully set out what they want pupils to know by the end of each year.’

Ofsted